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on foreign relations, he has a new book called foreign policy begins at home. >> and the problems of the administration is they want to rebalance toward asia, it is in the business literature there is always a conflict or tension between the urgent and the important an there is all of this urgent stuff coming from the middle east i am not saying it is important but there is truly important strategic stuff coming in asia and north america and at home and the challenge for the president is going to be to resist meof t pullf the urgent every kay every day and focus at home and focus in asia and get the balance right, that is what strategy is about. >> rose: we conclude this evening with ali babacan, he is the deputy prime minister of turkey. >> turkey and israel relations are very important for the whole region, because the region itself is going through a historical transformation process, like egypt, tunisia, yemen are trying to change, and also syria is in a very, very difficult situation. >> and the last thi that you would nt to see in the region is the turkish and israel relatio
is the turkish and israel relations getting worse. >> rose: american foreign policy, and turkish foreign policy when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. n't and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: richard haass is here, she the president of the council on foreign relations. he is a veteran observer of american foreign policy in his new book he looks inward and argues america must solve its domestic problems if it is going to be a foreign power, it is foreign policy begins as home, the case for putting america's house in order. i am pleased to have him here at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: so where does this book come from? what have you been looking and, thinking that perhaps we need to focus on restoration? >> well, first of all it is a book i never imagined i would write just for that reason. >> rose: foreign policy expert talks about the need to get the economic house in order
ignored for an opinion and the problem is we marched off to the tune foreign policy debacles there is a problem there. the secretary of defense to orchestrated the escalation of the 30 years later spoke of his regret we could count listen that it was a failure of the imagination to realize if french were the best informed westerners and we deny take them seriously because we assumed they had in for us. as the book recounts i went to their records and the french archives and what the advisers were telling him and they were not saying those americans had no coulter but what they said was they analyzed the intelligence the rich getting from vietnam vietnamese exiles were concentrated in paris they had a lot of good information and tried to step -- help with us but we could not hear it. >>host: are there times with other nations in type feelings the entire roman empire? >> that is the right question to ask and in that era of the golden age of the british empire officials will talk about the notion of why they encountered resistance in the indian colony but the explanation was whe
of refracting. john roberts with a live report. erratic foreign policy, k.t. erratic foreign policy, k.t. mcfarland and ambassador john at a dry cleaner, erratic foreign policy, k.t. mcfarland and ambassador john we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. lou: breaking news tonight. you allegations that the obama administration is trying to intimidate potential whistleblowers on the makati attack. republican counsel to the senate intelligence committee who is now representing a state department employee tells fox news that her client and others have also retained. the attorney is not naming her client that says that they do have sensitive information relevant
straight. we appreciate it. >> the red line in syria and erratic foreign policy, fox national security experts k.t. mcfarland and john bolton with us next. managing them, moving them, making them work. we oversee 20% of the world's financial assets. and that gives us scale and insight no one else has. investment manement combined with investment servicing. bringing the power of investments to people's lives. invested in the world. bny mellon. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. in >>. >> lou: joining me now, former pentagon official, fox news analyst. k.t. mcfarland, fox news contributor john bolton. k.t., let me start with you. the fact that we know now there are four whistleblowers that shall attacking as we specifically the position by the administration that there was no option to bring military force to bear. your thoughts? >> i understand that they want to cover up
: american foreign policy in retreat. is that bad, is that we are-- because, if i order recall, whee were on offense, we made a-- i don't know, obviously, i'm not an international relations-- ( bleep ). we made a-- it was bad, it was bad. is retreat bad for america? >> well, too much offense wasn't good. too much defense is also not good. there are too many problems out there, and we have to address them, and we have to do this in the right way. >> jon: where would you like to see us right now being more active? >> i think in the middle east, largely because many things happening there have great deal of impact on us, on our economy, on our security. and there's also the future of that region is right now being written in places like egypt and syria. >> jon: right. >> and without american leadership in the sense of giving some kind of guidance to countries in the region, taking a certain stance, things are not going to move in the right direction. >> jon: right. >> ultimately, we will end up having to get involved and fix it at some point, except it's going to cost us a lot more. >> jo
foreign policy in retreat". i even have a copy right here. welcome into "the war room," vali nasr. it does seem like a spectacularly good read given your experience. let's talk about syria, because that's what is at hand right now. the president has taken a long time to decide what to do here. how do you think he's handling it so far? and it is more about politics or the policy? >> it's really about defending view that he doesn't want to get engaged in the middle east he wants to reduce the importance in the middle east and focus on china. and if he were to focus on syria, he would be reversing his own policy. he has established that we are only going to get militarily involved or not involved at all. there's a lot we can do in between in terms of humanitarian assistance, and none of these have been discussed. >> michael:s and that's what is curious, and it makes me think in afghanistan -- theodore roosevelt had this talk softly and carry a big stick policy. it makes me wonder if this white house has ever talked about diplomasy before talking about arms. what
. >> paul: kim, the other thing that second term presidents often have is flexibility on foreign policy. fewer constraints, congress doesn't have the authority it does on domestic issues. but president obama has never really wanted to have an aggressive foreign policy agenda. so he doesn't have that kind of flexibility that you saw with reagan, for example or with bill clinton. >> no, and it is as you say largely self-imposed some people in the run up to the election looked what the did he in terms of troops in afghanistan and some of the other decisions and thought maybe this was simply about keeping things calm in the run up in the election. i think we have seen in particular after the election after syria, this is not a president not a president who wants to have a robust or big or foreign policy. that's not going to win him any marks out there either. >> are we going to see a big budget deal before this is over. the grand bargain very much going to come back here in a couple of months. >> yes. the other thing that's going to come back is the didn't ceiling fight. if the republicans
. then josh rogan from foreign policy magazine's the cable. he reports on national security and foreign policy. gentlemen, good to have you here. let's just start out of the gates talking about president obama and immigration. it's very interesting, i think, the optics for a lot of people to see the president cross the border into mexico city to talk about dreamers and what it means to come to this country as children and want to achieve the american dream and how the immigration reform system is broken. explain the optics of why the president feels to send that message from across the border. >> i think he's trying to build support among latino community for immigration reform and there's a lot of symbolic value in just going down to mexico and making that case. i'm not sure if it will put pressure on republicans who are really sort of the key constituency he has to get past. but as far as building public support among latino community for new immigration bill, i think going to mexico makes complete sense. >> ryan, what's the biggest obstacle for the president when he waits with the gang of e
or what i hear or see to reflect on american foreign policy. what do we do about that? >> yeah. okay. >> gentleman in the second row. >> from jaffa. i'm away from my country 65 years. i have just a little question. >> make it one. >> i can't make it -- just a small one. the united states gave sadat $76 million. gave israel 36 billion last year. our people in the gaza. -- before president obama went to the middle east, he sent the message to netanyahu, ask him, tell me the date which you are going to withdraw from the west bank, but he ignored that. when he went there, he said, i want to make two states. one jew, one palestinian. but he came back again -- >> do you have a question? >> yes. then the united states also to withdraw from the occupied land but they ignore that also. how can we police this state to take our -- >> the lady in the back. >> thank you, doctor. i'm an iranian american journalist, you spoke about different players in this -- on this issue. what about the role of iran? do you see the role of iran as positive or negative or -- and do you think that netanyahu's insi
capital. coming up, a man who advised on foreign policy. he said it is time we place a bet on ourselves. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> where are the biggest threats coming from? you might say iran. our biggest threat come from within. we have to clean up our house. he is not talking about home grown terror. he says we have jeopardized our power on the world stage by compromising the domestic foundations of our power. and only through greater investment inside our borders can we keep our ability to lead globally from diminishing. that's the thesis of foreign policy begins at home. a fantastic new book by richard haass. an honor
.s. foreign policy is to promote the united states of america is the one place is the image we project worldwide. we tell people all the time too everybody else. the problem with our allies if people have been coming some of them. we sought to change our laws to accommodate reality. do you think anybody will that in this country in that condition because that's what they wish to be? not at all. it is not so much the responsibility of mexico. just remember a lot of the policies in effect in this country have been defined in this various av, so a lot of the free kick model we have applied to countries that go was made in the u.s. day. so let's take responsibility. looking at this issue, the notion we can change immigration law by getting much more of these for, so-called highly specialized at the expense of community would be a tragedy, especially for latino communities. i don't want to sacrifice a single community. we are social animals. we function a lot better in the context of her families. i am so saddened when i hear these so-called systems from family divisions. i also believe we
that battle for power within obama administration sent american foreign policy into retreat making country look less engaged. joining us now, best selling author of brand-new book "the dispensable nation." vali nasr, welcome, we recommend your book. the need to stop leading militarily, you and i a having this conversation to day that president talks about game changers and red lines once again in syria and rhetori rhett continues. what is going on here? >> well preside laid down a red line if syria uses chemical weapon then u.s. will get involved in the conflict, syria -- there severed tha there is ea has done so, if america does not do anything, it is about our credibility. our willingness to enforce our red line, we're not doing so that would impact our standing. lou: our standing is already i guess, suspect, given all developments. we have watched the obama drama, if you will with north korea recede from headlines with boston bombing, we have now watching a president recede from his red line deck l declarationa number of months iran remains a in middle east, where is this leading us? >>
foreign policy going along swimmingly. who you concede that a region is dominated by terrorism, that is a failure of your foreign policy. i can tell you this. there are more are hadingogs bengazi that are coming and i would encourage you and your viewer to follow them closely and they are coming quickly. not to repeat what you and others have said. we sent them to serve. the least we can do find out the circumstances of their death and make sure we bring honor to their deaths and live up to the principles they espouse and believed in. you touched on the failure of security. we need to find out what happened in the siege itself and why aid was not sent and thirdly what we are going to find out. we know what susan said was false. there is not a person left in the western hemisphere believes what she said accurate. was she grossly negligent or whether it was an intentional misleading and secondly, there remains the prospect the administration's decision to blame it on a video may have impacted negour to get answers in the aftermath. >> are these hearingings- hearings are explosive
a dramatic shift in the debate of refracting. john roberts with a live report. erratic foreign policy, k.t. bolton is with us next lou: breaking news tonight. you allegations that the obama administration is trying to intimidate potential whistleblowers on the makati attack. republican counsel to the senate intelligence committee who is now representing a state department employee tells fox news that her client and others have also retained. the attorney is not naming her client that says that they do have sensitive information relevant to the benghazi attack during september 11 of 11th of last year. the eight hour time frame of which the attacks took place. in the eight day timeframe that followed. joining me now is fox news national security analyst k.t. mcfarland specifically as we understand it, we are positioned by the administration that there was no option available to bring military force to bear your thoughts. >> is there blood on some of the fans? that to me is blood on their hands. >> well, she has made a small specialty out of the intelligence community and the foreign affair
, is that his latest act of foreign policy fecklessness? provided further proof to iran, north korea and other adversa adversaries, whether states or terrorists, that he's not a force to be reckoned with." you're a student of this. >> unfortunately, yes. >> who passes out the song sheet? they all say the same thing. unless we go to this war, we can't go to the next war. we will go to the next war. day want all these wars. >> it's a neocon, hawkish. they're all part of the same unit here. i don't think they need to be cued. they're at this point already. they've never met a foreign policy crisis where a military intervention and more of it wasn't the right answer. and the thing that gets me about this particular line of argument is, if you talk to anyone who knows anything about any of this, all the military options are really difficult. they may not even be effective. i ran into a congress -- a democrat -- >> they don't care as long as they're in it. >> they don't care as long as we're in it. ask lindsey graham, what is your plan? what do you want to do? it's always do something, do something.
or atrocities in sir why or continuing rhetoric from iran and north korea, our foreign policy plate is packed and with seemingly no right answers, what is a president do? of course we are waiting right now on the initial court appearance for the three friends of dzhokhar tsarnaev. just the latest complication in our ongoing war on terror. the new york times chief washington correspondent david sanger, pulitzer prize winner and author of "confront and conce conceal" and it makes us think we are in a perpetual war against terror. not any specific organization but when small groups of people homegrown or foreign, can commit acts of terror, and it is impossible to stop the small groups, are we in a perpetual war? >> we are in a low grade. and the most interesting thing to my mind about the bombings and the horrific nature of it all is about what a different debate we would be having in this country today if it looked like it was directed by al qaeda, and of course it does not look like it has been. ten years ago we would be just about certain. maybe even five years ago that it would be. so it is
've never met a foreign policy crisis where a military intervention and more of it wasn't the right answer. and the thing that gets me about this particular line of argument is, if you talk to anyone who knows anything about any of this, all the military options are really difficult. they may not even be effective. i ran into a congress -- a democrat -- >> they don't care as long as they're in it. >> they don't care as long as we're in it. ask lindsey graham, what is your plan? what do you want to do? it's always do something, do something. but why should we do anything that won't work, or that might be ineffective just because iran will go after, laugh at us if we don't? it is backward logic. it's like they're playing a game with the lives of the americans who they will sacrifice to show that they're tough. >> bobby ghosh, you know, i think it was de gaulle who said to henry kissinger, why are you fighting in vietnam? he said, for our credibility. he said, with whom? he said, the middle east. he said, you think they're listening to this? and my question to you, bobby, let's look at the op
relations, author of brand-new book "foreign policy begins at home." and robin wright is a scholar at the united states institute of peace which i just drove by yesterday. a beautiful building. look at what the "washington post" is reporting late this afternoon. "president obama is preparing to send lethal weaponry to the syrian opposition and has taken steps to assert more aggressive u.s. leadership among allies and partners seeking the ouster of bashar al assad. according to senior administration officials." they did not say what equipment is being considered. robin wright, your thoughts on that? it's a limited bit of information. it could be rifles, could be grenades. who knows. >> i suspect at this point there is a very small quantity or very small type of weaponry. the real problem is a quarter century after we armed the mujahide,n, we are still buying back parts of stinger missiles and there's a real concern about we you arm any faction, how can you control and prevent those arms from going to other militias, being sold to other people, other parties, and extremist groups in
am i trying to accomplish in my foreign policy and he didn't do it. what are we trying to do? are we trying to topple assaud and put more rebels? in i think we're trying to stop the chemical weapons falling into the hands of al qaeda who will use them against our allies and againsts us. what do you want to do? you don't necessarily need to topple assad but you've got to destroy the chemical weapons. how do you that. >> go to fellows in the region. they have a fear of chemical weapons being loosed on them as we do. work with allies in the region. stop chemical weapons. commando raids. bombing attack. go to the russians. you have to as much to worry about radical islam as we do. we don't look too good after the boston bombings. we don't look like we can cooperate. cooperate quietly behind the scenes and share intelligence. bill: that is interesting. go in and destroy the chemical weapons. you wouldn't necessarily have to do that if you could secure them. >> either way. secure them or destroy them. bill: how do you do that? >> three things. not just us. the american military. get countr
think you're making -- >> which is why foreign policy begins at home. >> yes. >> dr. jeffrey sachs, thank you. stay with us. still ahead, kal penn will be here. he's teamed up with the discovery channel to find america's next great innovator. and why good foreign policy has to start here at home. that's the topic of the new book by richard haass. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. the american dream is of a better future, a confident retirement. those dreams have taken a beating lately. but no way we're going to let them die. ♪ ameriprise advisors can help keep your dreams alive like they helped millions of others. by listening. planning. working one on one. that's what ameriprise financial does. and that's what they can do with you. that's how ameriprise puts more within reach. ♪ >>> a foggy washington, d.c. on this tuesday morning. welcome back to "morning joe." back at the table, the president of the council on foreign relations, richard haass, the author of the new book out today, and let's start with syria because as we discussed last block with our other
, there was the perception that the gop had failed on foreign policy, a perception that i agree with. there was also the fact that the republicans did not do anything about the health care issue, did not do anything to promote a have been win free market -- a genuine free market in health care which i talk about in my book. and as a result of that, it made it inevitable that when it came time to deal with the health care issue, it would be dealt with on democratic terms. republicans, however, our rarely they had launched full frontal assaults on the size and scope of the federal government, have on occasion tried indirect routes to limiting the federal government. during the reagan years, we had sort of supply-side revolution where the idea would be that we would cut marginal tax rates which were then very onerous, the top rate was over 70 president. there 70%. it was definitely the time for some cutting, and the hope was that the economic growth that tax cuts and deregulation would unleash would allow a sort of covert assault on federal spending. the reagan administration with the help of a bipartisan conse
and the birth of the 21st century, christian carroll, contributing editor at foreign policy magazine, argues that 1979 the most pivotal year of the 20th century. adrian raine from the university of pennsylvania presents new research on the correlation between brain functions and violent crimes in "the anatomy of violence: the biological roots of crime." and richard haas, president of the council on foreign relations, argues that the u.s. needs to focus on restoring its economic infrastructure in "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. [inaudible conversations] >> we're very interested in -- >> [inaudible conversations] >> he's in prison right now, isn't he? >> i put siegelman in a bag, because i went over it, and it's not that i had any, you know, personal friendship with -- [inaudible] i didn't. i'm just saying i didn't do it out of all i know don siegelman. it's a case i read. you know, when i was in prison, too, i read the r
. >>> coming up, to act or not to act? we'll look at the delicate foreign policy decision hanging in the balance amid growing concerns that the syrian government has gone over the red line when nbc's richard engel joins us next on "now." [ female announcer ] switch to swiffer per, and you'll dump yur old broom. swiffer sweeper's electrostatic dry cloths attract and lock dirt, dust, and hair on contact to clean 50% more than a broom. it's a difference you can feel. swiffer gives cleaning a whole new meaning. would absolutely not have taken line in the jungle. i'm really glad that girl stayed at home. vo: expedia helps 30 million travelers a month find what they're looking for. one traveler at a time. expedia. find yours. >>> to use potential weapons of mass destruction on civilian populations crosses another line with respect to international norms and international law. and that is going to be a game-changer. >>> after declaring the use of sem cal weapons inside syria, a red line that would precipitate action, a reluctant facing calls for direct military intervention. >> i think t
of his second term today with a white house news conference. with foreign policy specifically syria on top of the agenda, now at least 13 people were killed and 70 wounded today by car bombs in the capital of damascus in that country's bloody on-going civil war while at least one child was killed and several people wounded in what witnesses describe as a syrian government air strike on a refugee camp near the turkish border. meanwhile, the guardian reports syrian rebels and the government of bashar al-assad are blaming each other for that chemical weapons attack monday. president obama had previously said the assad government would cross a "red line" if it used chemical weapons. and he sort of repeated that today. >> obama: the use of chemical weapons would be a game changer. not simply for the united states but for the international community. >> john: but mr. obama also seemed in no hurry to move. >> obama: with a we now have is evidence that chemical weapons have been used inside of syria but we don't know how they were used when they were used, who used them. and when i am make
't change american foreign policy. we will be less dependent on oil from the middle east. concern is that china today gets 70% of its energy supplies from the middle east. india is about the same. europe as well. in the global economy is so interlinked that even if the u.s. is not dependent on middle eastern oil, i feel like the instability in the region where the chinese economy and the european economy. so, you know, i think we should step back and do less, but i don't think we can ignore the middle east because it is going to -- turbulence there will impact the worldwide oil prices. and we have seen it with the european debt crisis. if our economic problems in europe, we have economic problems here. >> going back to the question, if you think about today it is not the middle east, but you have this same moderate and we hope, some moderate muslims. then you have the ruling elite who are very radical muslims. how can we support the moderates without changing the many as of their own people? it is a problem. it could be a problem in egypt. it certainly is a problem in pakistan tha
's have a muscular foreign policy. all the metaphors for war that has us stuck once again in a country whose name we dare not pronounce a decade later. i spent all day yesterday at the george w. bush library. not once did i hear the word iraq. not once. if this crowd is proud of the wars they pushed, why are they afraid to remind us of the last one or even pronounce the word? david corn, mother bureau chief for "mother jones" magazine and david ignatius. you just came back from the are we going into this war? syria? >> i think the first thing to middle east, sir? what is happen? say is the white house is being very careful in weighing the evidence of chemical weapons use. i was just in israel. i sat with the israeli commanders as they presented their evidence, as they said nearly 100% solid in their minds that syria has used chemical weapons. the question is why is the white house waiting when president obama said this is a red line? the answer is that properly, as you were stressing, he wants to be sure of the evidence and also to be sure that he can take it to the u.n. and internatio
-- that story, again from "the washington times" this morning. benjamin parker is a foreign policy senior editor for foreignpolicy.com. thank you for joining us. take as to the latest on u.s. options that are discussed, boots on the ground was discussed yesterday on the sunday shows. where are things going right now? atst: at a pretty to look what intelligence is actually done. this conflict has been going on for dnearly two years. thee developments threaten intensity of international involvement. here's a quick time line. april 18 government but a letter to the u.s. general informing them that chemical weapons have been used around three cities. it was well samples, witness interviews, rebel material. at a security conference it was said that -- [inaudible] the u.s. administration have been given its intelligence. week hasurse of one gone from -- really the administration has gone from one reported back in january or there was a cable thatwith the notion chemical weapons had been used. really within the past week has gone from no catboat -- from no chemical weapons being used in syria to a 180.
with his outlook for the economy, chairman of law for associates, a foreign-policy adviser for ronald reagan. good to have you with us. >> site you very much. fun to be with you. lou: things are coming up. things are -- everyone is talking. so down and so anxious and concerned. i mean, what's going on. >> you have a very slow recovery really the thing i see that is wonderful is the obama's lost his ability to relieve materially affect legislation and bad economic policy. i think the era of obama is over , although we will have to live with his policies. i am looking to 2014 and 16 to major changes politically. seeing a very bright future for the u.s. lou: a fascinating perspective. you effectively believe -- >> yes. all of his big stuff occurred when a control the house and senate and was president. pelosi, reid, obamacare and all the other stuff. now he does not have the same power. frankly, i don't think you can push through bad legislation like you used to. that is a very good sign for the country. sen are later we will get rid of obamacare almost entirely. it is a terrible program
? >> a second term supposed to be dominated by domestic issues a immersed by foreign policy. the benghazi investigation is going to heat up again next week as congress dives in next week. after a press confer ren yesterday the president quickly was con vontfronted by this sub. evidences not aware members of congress has been trying for months to gain access to state department employees who may know more about security failures in the attack that killed four americans. fleem at the state department one at the cia are considering coming forward as potential whistleblowers. >> i am not familiar with this notion that anybody has been blocked from testifying. i will find out what exactly you are referring to. >> they pressed for information about events leading up to the attack as well as u.s. response. >> i think what we are going to find out next week is this effort to delay and hide has been going on since shortly after benghazi. this is not a new phenomenon. >> there are other considerations here. is the administration covering up what happened in benghazi? 46 percent say yes. clearly a s
an article about why it is you, a member of the foreign policy establishment wrote that the biggest foreign policy challenges are now at home and what the piece is about. >> that kind of sounds like your book! >> wildly different from the book! wildly different. way out on a limb! >> "foreign policy begins at home the case for putting america's house in order." that would be the title. looks like a great article. anything else in "time"? >> oh, boy, here we go. joe klein, political moderates have stayed quiet too long and time to speak up. an angry obama finally. >> he is saying that people on the extremes have been shouting for the longest time and people in the center, moderates need to do a little shouting now. >> get some work done in washington. the fall and rise of mark sanford. this is a great issue. >> that looks great. >> it's a very amusing piece. >> can a one time conservative hero climb back from disgrace? in south carolina anything is possible. that election is on tuesday waenel be watchiand we will be watching that closely. >>> in efforts to save gun reforms in congress one of
continues to refuse to treat mexico is a full partner in economics and foreign policy. it is a shame. president obama continues to condescend that he should leave. closing arguments under way at the jodi areas murder trial. any border sheriff who has a new idea about public safety. fire and ice, parts of the country battling the elements. record snowfall in the heartland he joins us on the market's next move. [ agent smith ] i've found software that intrigues me. it appears it's an agent of good. ♪ [ agent smi ] ge software connects patients to nurses to the right machines while dramatically reducing waiting time. [ telephone ringing ] now a waiting room is just a room. [ static warbles ] lead paint poisoning affects one million children today. it's also 100% preventable. if your home was built before 1978, visit leadfreekids.org to learn more. the wright brothers became the first in flight. [ goodall ] i think the most amazing thing is how like us these chimpanzees are. [ laughing ] [ woman ] can you hear me? and you hear your voice? oh, it's exciting! [ man ] touchdown confirmed.
partner in economics and foreign policy. it is a shame. president obama continues to condescend that he should leave. closing arguments under way at the jodi areas murder trial. any border sheriff who has a new idea about public safety. fire and ice, parts of the country battling the elements. record snowfall in the heartland record snowfall in the heartland he joins us on the market the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her... no. no! no. ...likes 50% more cash. but i don't give up easy... do you want 50% more cash? yes! yes?! ♪ [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase, plus 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. ♪ what's in your wallet? why? and we've hit the why phase... lou: breaking news, the month of may bringi severe weather across the country. firefighters in california battling two wildfires, including a 6000-acre fire that has forced evacuations and destroyed homes about 50 miles west of los angeles
university looking airtimes jobs, education politics drugs the media and foreign policy. tv and radio host tavis smiley moderated the first conversation with latino leaders. it's just over three hours. >> hello i'm tavis smily and aisle honored to be part of this examination, latinos beyond the numbers, please can this august panel we assembled for this conversation. i'm going to introduce them one by one. i'm delighted to be moderating this session. there are two panels con -- con veeping here in chicago. plies thank chicago state university for having us here. we appreciate the invitation. i've been here before, but these conversations, so i'm honored to be back here at this great institution opposite again. there's an afternoon panel another one of those conversations. that will be moderated by fer ferrari unanimous dough and another august panel of eight brilliant opinion makers and this is but one of these conversations. so if you happen to be watching this one now make sure you take notes of your programming sched
on capitol hill today about the obama administration's foreign policy. she offered her thoughts on iran, syria, and south korea. >> it is my pleasure to welcome madeleine albright. she's excited to take questions. away all of your member cards. we are all about social media right now. acretary albright has been beacon of the values all around the world. that, she serves as a role model. she is the north star for strong national security policy. she reminds us that america is the indispensable nation, not the only nation that makes a difference, but the one required to bring out of the other nations together. the first secretary of state to be a woman. there have been so many in her shadows. she is also not afraid to dive in the political fights. doors,knocking on canvassing. she is ready to get into the dirt. that is what we all need to do to get the policies that we need. i have had the honor of her guidance because she serves on our advisory board. to the endurance of leadership, madeleine albright used to be the president for the center of national policy. having her today helps us b
with scott snyder eight director of the u.s.-korean policy at the couple on foreign relations. >> host: one of the basic features of the book is north korea is the impossible state because no one inside is empowered to overthrow and it no one on the outside cares enough to risk the cost of changing it. i want to ask you about both of those. in particular starting with no one is embauered to overthrow. why too you think that has been the case in north korea? i mean, especially from a politics perspective, this makes north korea an outliar compared to what we saw with the former soviet union. >> guest: i think that observation is quite accurate, i think. when we look at the soviet union, when we look at the regimes in the arab spring, all of which have had leaders in power longer than the former recently deceased north korean leader. they all collapsed and north korea continues to survive. so that alone is evidence that nobody within the system is empowered to overthrow it. and i think it's also just because, as you know well, the very strict controls that exist in this country, a society in
that missile. what's going on. >> i think you'll get foreign policy. the question of wmd, have we crossed the red line? this is a point of what the president is going to achieve in his second term. he has a lot he would like to get done. the window closes pretty quickly on a second term. aside from progress on immigration reform, we haven't seen a lot of progress in a lot of areas. he lost gun control. questions about whether republicans are going to revolt over the debt ceiling. i think the president we've seen on his so-called charm offensive, i'm not sure there have been a lot of second dates on that. the president is going to try and goose his domestic policy agenda here and tell congress to start moving on it. a lot of questions on domestic policy, as well as foreign policy and of course the big questions about there about terror and the boston marathon. >> and economic issues. kristine romans is also standing by. the stock market is doing great now. there's still a long way to go. there is this debt ceiling deadline looming at the end of july when the nation's debt ceiling has to be
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